Adam Cesare on What Makes a Horror Fan

Adam Cesare, author of Tribesmen, Bone Meal Broth, and Video Night wrote a great post last week about the what gets most people into horror and the split of the horror fiction fans and the horror movie fans. Here is a sample of what he has to say:

Horror fans are a diverse bunch, but every one that I’ve ever talked to has a single commonality: their obsession started when they were young.

We may keep our eyes glued to the news sites, downloading the newest trailers and demanding up-to-the minute word on our favorite creators, but our interests always loop back around to what hooked us as kids. In this way, we’re a nostalgic bunch and I hope you’ll indulge me I wax nostalgic for a minute in this post.

Notice that I didn’t say horror movie fans. I just said horror fans, which I feel is an important distinction. Well, actually I think it should be the most unimportant distinction of all, a non-existent distinction, but sadly it is one.

Confused yet? Sorry, let me try again.

It was the movies that hooked me. Browsing the video store, I was both attracted to and terrified of the horror section. I wanted so badly to enjoy these films that I begged and bartered with my parents.They were pretty permissive and let me have what I wanted. The thing was, when I was that young, I could only take about five minutes of Halloween, and the closest I got to Freddy was errant glances at his videotape covers. So I started slow, stuck with the classic monsters. Great as they are, the films of the 1930s,’40s and ’50s didn’t quite hit the same “instant terror” nerve for me as their color counterparts.

This was how I became a monster kid, which is a term that outdates me by a few decades, but still one that’s applicable to a select group of young people today. Some would claim that it’s only applicable to those who were around for the ’50s-’70s, but to hell with that. The few, the proud: the monster kids.

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Guest Post: Summer of Zombie Interview with Todd Brown

The Non-Horror Reader Survey is taking part of the Summer of Zombie Blog tour. We have a Guest Interview of Horror author Todd Brown (Dead series, Zomblog). We haven’t touched much on the subject of zombies here at NHRS because while it is a sub-genre, it is a large sub-genre. Many books have built the mythos of this undead creature. Just as many, if not more, have analyzed them. Whether you love them or hate them, zombies speak to a part of the human condition. If you enjoy the interview, please check out the Facebook Page of the blog tour and check out all the other posts going on.

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Three Months Already!

Hey everyone,

I truly apologize that it has been nearly Three months since I updated the site. Things were lined up, but never came through. Then life took precedence. I wish I could say I had stuff in the works coming up, but to be honest, I don’t. But I will be working on that. I’m going to try and line up some Guest Posts, possible related to blog tours coming up. It might be a while before I can do a Book Spotlight as I’m going back to school and I’ll have enough reading to do with that I won’t have much personal reading time. But if I can find some that fit, I will post them here first.

Women in Horror Month: Mama’s Boy and Other Dark Tales

Title: Mama’s Boy and Other Dark Tales
Author: Fran Friel
Publisher: Apex Publications

We are wrapping up Women in Horror Recognition month with a book that exemplifies what women bring to the genre. Mama’s Boy and Other Dark Tales by Fran Friel is a collection that in one light is very diverse, is also tied together by recurring themes and ideas you don’t see much in horror.

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Women in Horror Month: The Haunting of Hill House

Title: The Haunting of Hill House
Author: Shirley Jackson
Publisher: Penguin

“The literary effect we call horror turns on the dissolution of boundaries, between the living and the dead, of course, but also, at the crudest level, between the outside of the body and everything that ought to stay inside.”

-Laura Miller (from the introduction to The Haunting of Hill House)

To be perfectly honest, Laura Miller’s introduction will say everything about this book I wish to say and in a more elegant way. Though, unless you don’t mind spoilers, I wouldn’t read it until you read The Haunting of Hill House.

So where should I start? Madness? Ghosts?

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Women in Horror Month: Spellbent

Title: Spellbent
Author: Lucy A. Snyder
Publisher: Del Rey

When any book is nominated for the Stoker Award, it automatically has a quality that others won’t. Spellbent by Lucy Snyder is a urban fantasy about a novice witch, Jessie Shimmer, caught in the middle of a horrible accident that will change not only her, but the world she is a part of. Her boyfriend, Cooper Marron, is pulled into a hellish dimension while they were trying to call rain to end a drought. The damage caused by the rip in dimensions causes a cover-up of supernatural proportions with Jessie now considered a fugitive for things she never knew about or took part in.

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Women in Horror Month: Morbid Curiosity

Title: Morbid Curiosity
Author: Deborah LeBlanc
Publisher: Leisure Horror

Not only will this be the first post for Women in Horror Recognition Month, but this will also be the first Fan Horror Level Spotlight we’ve done. Morbid Curiosity is the story of twin sisters, Haley and Heather, that lost there father to physical illness and mother to mental. They are shipped from Louisiana to their paternal grandparents in Mississippi. They loss of parents, friends, and lifestyle is too much for both of them, but more so for Haley. A popular girl in school, Karla, decides to help them out by showing them how she became popular: Chaos Magic. And like it’s name implies, chaos slowly takes over the lives of Haley and Heather.

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One Buck Horror

A tough economy will impact all forms of entertainment. When it comes to the horror genre, it could be lethal. In fact, a number of markets for the genre have gone under since the recession started. But there is one that has started recently that is taking advantage of the all the current conditions in publishing. One Buck Horror is a ebook digest of horror short fiction. As the name implies, it costs a dollar ($0.99 to be exact). If you check the ebooks that are the same price, both the quality and quantity is very inconsistent.  One Buck Horror contains five stories that are well written and, sometime a rarity in, edited and formatted.

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